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VOL. XVII, NO. 8
12/1/98 - 12/31/98
STILL FREE

Inside:
Editorial
Life Forms
Letters to the Editor
Community Calendar
Jefferson Report
Developing Intuition
Merging of Cultures
Doonesbury
Events, Etc.
The New IMAX Theater
Beethoven and Blue Jeans
Modern Composer
Book Collecting
Comic Books
Book Review
Mobile Then & Now
What Do Russians Read?
The Amsterdam Guitar Trio
Paradise Lost
Dr. Jomo

A Simple Cost-Benefit Study or Something More

by Edmund Tsang

Judging from Jim Apple's simple but narrow approach in performing the cost-benefit analysis for the City of Mobile Industrial Development Board (IDB) to finance the Phenolchemie project, it is hard to imagine that, when The Harbinger made a request for a copy of such a study in March, 1994, IDB counsel Mack Binion said the study was "confidential."

A 1992 change in state legislation governing IDB's, Alabama Act 599, requires a cost-benefit analysis to determine the impact of granting property-tax exemptions before the boards issue bonds to finance business relocation to or expansion in Alabama... [_Full_Story_]


Finishing the Unfinished Business:

A Community Dialogue on Social Justice & Equality

by Elliott Lauderdale

When I meet someone from the North and tell them I am from Mobile, they often act or say something to express their sympathy. We are the city where a lynching occurred in recent memory and live in the state where dogs were set to civil rights marchers. What our northern friends sometimes forget is that we are also the home of most of the civil rights marchers, both black and white.

The goal of a series of town meetings and a regional summit entitled Unfinished Business: Overcoming Racism, Poverty, and Inequality in the South was to formulate a Southerners' collective definition of the new South, an approach to replace that of Bull Conners and the Dixiecrats. The majority of citizens in the South have quietly changed their minds about segregation. This meeting was in part called to commemorate a mid-November meeting in Birmingham sixty years ago to address basic human needs and to hear speakers such as Eleanor Roosevelt and Justice Hugo Black. While Police Commissioner Conners ordered the meeting segregated, the conference promoted ideas of accessible health care, racial equality, public education, public defenders, and equal pay for equal work. [_Full_Story_]


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